Bulimia Nervosa: How Much Treatment Costs

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Bulimia is a serious mental health disorder that can cause severe complications like death if not treated immediately. Bulimia nervosa is a type of eating disorder that allows the person to undergo binge and purging episodes in controlling their weight. What causes a person to have bulimia is sometimes linked to the social pressure of thin-is-in principles. Other factors include dysfunctional family dynamics, childhood trauma or abuse, and environmental stress.

The problem is rooted on poor self-esteem and body image disturbance. Most common in women from teenagers to younger adults, this condition can also affect men in the same age range.

There are varying reports when it comes to the prognosis of bulimia nervosa. An epidemiological report in the UK states that 80% of people with bulimia make a complete recovery with treatment, while a report published in the US showed 45% to 75% full recovery. Either way, these are good reports. For those who do not seek treatment, the mortality rate is at 0.32% to 3.9%.

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Types of therapy and treatment goals

Studies showed that successful treatment can be achieved if the person is willing to commit to recovery. Depending on the severity of the condition, the person can be treated as an in-patient or out-patient basis. Those who need urgent medical attention because of the medical complications of bulimia, they need hospitalization first to treat and manage the apparent symptoms such as electrolyte replacement or response to internal bleeding. After they get discharged, it is highly advised that they continue treatment, this time to help treat the underlying cause which is bulimia nervosa.

Treatment goals for bulimia nervosa will include:

  • To become medically stable and prevent further complications from developing
  • To learn healthy eating habits and value food as a nourishing element and not as a reward or punishment
  • To build a strong sense of self-worth, develop a positive self-esteem and acceptance of positive body image.
  • To treat co-occurring psychiatric conditions or substance use disorders
  • To lay the foundation for a satisfying, fulfilling future

The inpatient treatment will require 30 to 90 days depending on the response of the patient to the therapies and treatment procedures. Chronic cases sometimes can reach up to six months of inpatient admission. The patient will receive services for medical care, housing, planned and therapeutic meals, staffing and adjunct therapies. If the patient is evaluated to have mild or moderate symptoms related to bulimia, the mental state could still be at its initial stage and can be managed on an out-patient basis. The patient will have several psychotherapy sessions and medications to complete the treatment protocol.

How much therapy costs

Inpatient treatment can range anywhere from $500 to $2,000 a day, and the average cost for a 30-day stay in a treatment facility is $30,000. Outpatient care, including medical monitoring and continuing therapy, can reach upwards of $100,000. insurance coverage is available as long as it is medically necessary. Your medical provider can provide the needed requirements to the insurance companies to have this approved.

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Treatment costs can be a lot. However, it is critical to help the person recover and live a normal life. Costs still would depend on some factors like location and the accreditation of the therapist and the facility. You can ask for payment options as some medical facilities have their own offers and programs that provide special payment arrangements. If you have questions pertaining to treatment costs, you can try to visit this site and learn from the experts: https://www.betterhelp.com/advice/therapy/can-i-afford-to-see-a-counselor-how-much-does-therapy-cost/

First Line Therapies For Bulimia Nervosa

Facts on Bulimia

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Bulimia nervosa has become a worldwide dilemma that destroys the lives of men, women, adults and teens alike. Individuals with bulimia are caught up in a vicious cycle of too much eating and then depriving themselves of fullness by vomiting or purging. It is considered a life-threatening disease because binge eating and purging – the two hallmarks of bulimia – tremendously damage the physical, mental and emotional health of those suffering from this eating disorder.

 

Among bulimics, more than half of them have depression and anxiety. Additionally, 30% to 70% are suffering from a certain addiction and 34% are at risk of self-infliction and even suicide, which reportedly is one of the most common causes of death. That is why it is imperative for individuals with bulimia to seek treatment at the early stage of the disease. The challenge is that most of these individuals are hesitant to go forward because of fear and shame of being judged. Nevertheless, it would be helpful to know some pertinent signs and symptoms of this deadly eating disorder. Some of these are:

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  • Unusually depressed or anxious
  • Low self-esteem
  • Unhealthy teeth and gums
  • Wounds and calluses on the knuckles of the hands
  • Eating too much food, and then going to the bathroom after eating
  • Dry, cracked skin
  • Have mood swings and erratic behaviour patterns

 

 

Treating Bulimia Nervosa

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There are currently several treatments – natural and medical – that have been utilized to help cure bulimic patients, but the most essential therapies that have shown positive outcomes are nutritional counseling, cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, and drug therapy. Let us describe each of these therapies and understand how they work and help bulimic patients recover from bulimia nervosa.

 

  1. Nutritional counseling. Medical nutrition therapy is a fundamental part of the treatment of eating disorders. It is aimed at helping patients realize the importance of eating normally and healthily by consistently meeting their nutritional requirements. Doing this slowly trains them to eat right, and then the process of healing the distorted self-image because of food comes next. It is also reinforced by support groups and individualized counseling to help lighten the patients’ struggles during recovery.

 

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. It is a type of psychotherapy that is considered to be the treatment of choice for bulimic patients. CBT is focused on helping the patients identify the negative behavioral patterns that they had formed from their bulimia, and then replacing these patterns with positive ones. The process starts with first trying to stop the binge and purging episodes through a reward system. The patients are also asked to monitor their eating schedules and find ways to stop themselves when they feel like vomiting. In several studies, CBT has shown to reduce the symptoms of bulimia by 50%.

 

  1. Family Therapy. The Maudsley method was utilized by patients with anorexia and had shown positive outcomes, which is why experts have started to use this on bulimics. A study was performed on 80 bulimic patients who underwent family therapy. After six months, 39% of them were able to stop binging and purging. It was reportedly more effective when tested on adolescent bulimics.

 

  1. Drug therapy. The most common medications recommended by physicians are the SSRIs, particularly fluoxetine and sertraline. These drugs have shown to tremendously reduce binging and purging urges, especially when combined with cognitive behavioral therapy.

 

 

If you want to know more about bulimia and its other forms of therapy, you can visit BetterHelp and see about the assistance they provide with their pool of online therapists ready to help. If you’re interested in other similar services, you might look into Talkspace, 7cups, and others for this type of support via the internet.